Federal crimes are much more serious than state level offenses. If convicted, you face lengthy incarceration in a federal prison system and costly fines.
In criminal law, people often make the mistake of thinking that being arrested is the same as being detained.
Being charged with any type of crime is a serious matter. Depending on the type of offense, you could face severe penalties like prison time, fines, community service, and parole.
Dealing with criminal charges is often a highly emotional and stressful time in a person’s life. Feelings of shame and guilt are common, and you may not wish to share everything (or anything) with your loved ones. Fortunately, an experienced defense lawyer can be the shoulder and ear you need to vent your fears and frustrations, and they will provide thoughtful advice on how to move forward.
Identity theft is a serious offense that can have far-reaching consequences on a victim’s life. Although it is a white-collar crime, the penalties are severe and typically involve fines, restitution, and incarceration.
When it comes to paying taxes, the federal government does not mess around. You might be surprised to learn that numerous behaviors are classified as tax crimes. If you are convicted of any of these serious offenses, seek competent legal representation immediately.
An accusation of federal fraud is a serious matter that requires the counsel of an experienced attorney. Forgery, a type of fraud, is a white-collar crime that carries severe penalties as well as a stigma.
Racketeering refers to a criminal activity in which an organization runs an illegal business, known as a racket, which creates a problem for others for the purpose of solving it through some type of extortion. In other words, racketeering is when an organized group intimidates legitimate businesses, or individuals coercing them into allowing the group to embezzle money from their business.
If you are facing a drug-related criminal charge in Wyoming, you may be wondering if your case can become a federal issue.
In the United States, most criminal prosecutions are handled within state jurisdictions, meaning the defendant has violated the law and is subsequently tried in a state court.